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Aerial View, Elland Road with Football and Greyhound Stadiums


Aerial View, Elland Road with Football and Greyhound Stadiums
Description:
1962. Aerial view of Elland Road, on the left side of the road is the oval Greyhound Stadium, which was demolished in 1982. In the bottom left corner is the Heath estate. In the bottom right corner is the Leeds United Football Club Stadium. First used for rugby league matches, it was purchased in 1904 by Leeds City Football Club (The Peacocks)who were elected to the Football League in 1905. The club reached the second division but were eventually expelled from the Football League in the 1919-20 season due to financial irregularities. Leeds United Football Club was formed in 1919 and elected to the Football League in 1920. Over the years, Leeds United has enjoyed outstanding success, particularly in the years when Don Revie took over the management. There have also been setbacks and disappointments but Leeds United continues to attract loyal supporters to Elland Road. The capacity of the stadium is 40,296 and many fans hold season tickets.

User Comments:

Name:
Jeremy McMahon

Comment:
Leeds City were disbanded in 1919 over an illegal payments scandal during the First World War. Leeds United were formed almost immediately afterwards (not 1913).

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Name:
Don SMITH

Comment:
The stand to the left of the pitch is the west stand,in 1957 I was the foreman painter for Marsh Jones& Cribb, The main contactor was Robert R Roberts& the steel work was done by Dunlop&Rakin.The club had to sell John Charles to pay for it

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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
If my memory serves me correctly;in the early 1960's, the large factory opposite the Greyhound Stadium, manufactured boilers; but I can't remember their name. Further on towards the railway bridge, the next biulding was a petrol station. In the top left-hand corner, Gelderd Road & The Ring Road form a triangle. On its apex is the Wheatsheaf Public House. On the extreme left of the picture, is an area of waste land, shown here to be between Elland and the Ring Road.This, to children at this period and previous, was known as the "Milky Way". It was an area of undulating ground and large hollows where we would race around on push-bikes. It was total enjoyment for hours on end.

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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Name:
Nigel H

Comment:
Further to Grahams comments the factory opposite the greyhound track did indeed make boilers and also catering equipment, all hand made in stainless steel, they had their own casting foundry,machine shop,polishing dept and chrome plate section and a very skilled sheet metal working section, it was called Jackson Boilers and I served my apprenticeship there from 1975 - 1980. The company was bought out by Tube Investments (T.I) and it became known as T.I Catering.

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Name:
michael mcguinness

Comment:
My wife and I used to go to the dog track with our friends Pat and Ralf. It only had space for 5 lanes so we used to go for the forecast, so we invariably won, but not always. On Friday nights there used to be a car auction there. I have bought a few cars there myself, I remember we once went down as a family because you could buy pasties and chips in the bar. This particular time I had warned my son not to scratch his nose so of course he did I told him he had just bought a car, his little face was a treat to see. When I was a teenager still at school (Green Lane) we used to get free tickets for the childrens enclosure, this was facing the scratching shed (the stand that backs on to Elland Road) if you look closely at the photograph you can see the boys enclosure facing the scatching shed. I remember going to Elland Road for years, that is until they sold JOHN CHARLES to Italy, even in those day the Italians dominated the transfer market.

Email:
michael_1938@live.co.uk

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Name:
Christine Hebenton

Comment:
May I concur with Graham Schofield about the undulating ground which he refers to as 'The Milky Way'. I did not know it by this name but I did spend hours with friends riding pushbikes there in the late 50's/early 60's. Very pleasurable memory.

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Name:
Peter Moore

Comment:
Yes Michael McGuinness is correct when he says there was only room for 5 dogs to race at Elland Road, the traps went 1,2,4,5,6, with no number 3. My late dad used to breed greyhounds, and raced them at Elland Road (amongst other tracks) during the 2nd World War, I well remember spending many happy hours with him down there.

Email:
dipetmo@aol.com

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Name:
Don Smith

Comment:
The 'Milky Way' as Graham name'd it, was used through the 2nd world war for the training of army dispatch riders, [ messenger's on motor bikes], we used to ride our bikes from the Wellington Rd area over Wortley Rec to this place, we used to call it 'The Up's And Downs', we spent houers on there having fun and best of all it cost nothing.

Email:
anne-donsmith@shaw.ca

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Name:
brian thomas

Comment:
Well remembered the 'Milky Way' ! Hunslet Rugby League played at the Greyhound Stadium after they were chucked off "Parkside'. In the extreme bottom right you can just see the corner of Holbeck Cricket Clubs' ground.A great little venue I used to spend hours there as a kid.I played football for Leeds Supporters Club.You can see the 2 Shedlike buildings that were the Clubhouse.This area was a Speedway Stadium before the War known as Fullerton Park used as LUFCs practice pitch until a few years ago. The Hol-Beck is seen winding it's way to the Aire at Leeds and the area is named from this.

Email:
helensdad@mac.com

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Name:
Mike North

Comment:
If the area spoken of as the Milky Way was opposite the Cottingley Crematorium, we always knew it as the ups and downs or ups un dahns as we would have said then

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Name:
Mike North

Comment:
It`s true there were only 5 lanes at the Elland Road Greyhounds Hence the sage advice "Nivver back `t 3 dog"

Email:
micnrth@aol.com

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Name:
malcolm cooper

Comment:
My first girlfriend worked at the greyhound stadium during 1965/66. Her name is Jessie and she lived in the Tong Lane/Tong Road area of Farnley. She will now be in her late fifties. can any one who knows her, please contact me? My phone number is 07803263362.

Email:
Patandmalc@patandmalc.wanadoo.co.uk

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Name:
Wendy Collins

Comment:
I was one of the children who lived at Beeston Royds(opposite the Pit Hills, Milky Way or Ups and Downs) I always thought they were formed from the remains of opencast mining. Each of the undulations were given names one was the Wall of Death.

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Name:
Dave

Comment:
i live just behind the old greyhound track & im very interested in comments & pictures. please feel free to email with your experiences & especially the old photos. I'm finding it very hard to find history about this area, in particular the greyhound track. i would love to write about the history of this site and the characters that frequented it. many thanks. dave

Email:
dsbrandon@btinternet.com

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Name:
Dave

Comment:
i live just behind the old greyhound track & im very interested in comments & pictures. please feel free to email with your experiences & especially the old photos. I'm finding it very hard to find history about this area, in particular the greyhound track. i would love to write about the history of this site and the characters that frequented it. many thanks. dave

Email:
dsbrandon@btinternet.com

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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
With reference to Mike North's comment. The "Milky-Way" started just beyond the stone wall on the west side of Elland Road where it met the Ring Road. It then ranged along the Ring Road to as far as, and slightly beyond the hamlet of "Beeston Near Royds", to give it its full title, as Wendy Collins says. The hamlet being on the opposite side of the road of course. You can locate this hamlet if you draw a perpendicular from the the north end of the Greyhound Stadium. "Beeston Near Royds" has gone now. Crushed beneath the so-called Wheels of Progress, its bones would be found beneath the car-parks of the Retail Park that now stands just beyond the crematorium grounds. Further to Wendy Collins' comment. Yes a lot of the water-filled dips in the Milky Way had names. I forget them now, and I suppose that different groups of people used different names, but I do remember the WALL OF DEATH. A friend of mine, dislocated his shoulder when he flew off his bike while attempting some 'amazing acrobatic feat' in that particular hole.

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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Name:
Paul Emmett

Comment:
My father used to go the the Elland Road dog track every Monday and Saturday all the year round. We used to join him on Saturday nights in the summertime, together with other relatives. In the late 1940s and very early 1950s I seem to remember that a bugle used to sound out of the speakers, which used to terrify me. I used to watch the numbers spinning round in a huge electro-mechanical computer as the bets were being processed. It was the first computer I ever saw and the same work could probably be done now by a device you could put in your pocket.

Email:
pwemmett@yahoo.co.uk

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Name:
Paul Emmett

Comment:
You had quite a view from the south east stand at the Elland Road greyhound race track. You could see Pudsey Church and Town Hall and houses at Lower Wortley. You could see electric pylons in the fields beyond Wortley. One Saturday night during the summer, at the age of about nine, I jokingly asked my aunt to put a bet on for me. She pointed to a building in the distance and said that if she were to place a bet for me she would end up in that building over there. She was pointing to Armley Jail. I found that greyhound racing had a unique atmosphere and, in those seconds between the dogs being put into the traps and the onset of the noise of the hare as it started its journey round the track to where the dogs were, there was an eerie silence throughout the stadium, except that is for the muffled yelping of the dogs inside the traps. I remember that there was an overhead light stretching from one side of the track to the other, and that as night fell this light would be switched on, shining down on the dogs as they approached the finishing line. I can't remember if they were men or women who used to take the dogs round to all four corners of the track for the punters' inspection before each race. As we lived near the town end of Elland road we used to talk about the 'losers' trams,' supposedly full of miserable faces as they returned towards the centre of Leeds. We would see those going by before 9.30pm. Further crowded trams returning to the town centre after 9.30pm were said to be the 'winners' trams,' all supposed to be full of smiling faces. When I was extremely small, my parents and I would sometimes be travelling back to the other end of Elland Road on one of the losers' trams. I'm told that on occasions I used to laugh at my own reflection in the window inside the tram and that this used to cheer the losers up and they would forget about the money they'd lost. Incidentally, the boiler making company across the road from the dog track was called 'Jackson Boilers.' I think I remember this place being built and I believe it was on the site of the former Fullarton Park Motor Cycle Speedway.

Email:
pwemmett@yahoo.co.uk

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Name:
Sue n Dave

Comment:
My husband and myself grew up on the Heath estate where the greyhound track was. My mum worked during the day as a cleaner there and in the bars at night. My grandad also painted the outside walls of the restaurant. Dave says he remembers Jackson boilers - his mum worked there. He also remembers the area just after the railway bridge which he says was known as fairburn and lawsons.

Email:
susanwalker170@hotmail.com

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Name:
Don Smith

Comment:
Yes Dave is right about the field just past the railway bridge it did belong to Fairburns it was there sports field,my school mates and I would bike all the way from Green Lane in Wortley with a football and have a game on there pitch, I remember the goals had nets on them, some times the gounds keeper would come back in the evening and run us off.

Email:
anne-donsmith@shaw.ca

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Name:
Philip Dalling

Comment:
The Leeds greyhound track was last used for speedway in 1938. The Nottingham team withdrew from league racing at the end of May that year, due to falling attendances, and the team transferred to Fullarton Park. The promoter at both Nottingham and Leeds was the former rider Arthur Westwood.

Date:
19-Sep-2008

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Name:
Peter Moore

Comment:
Being brought up in Old Beeston during WW2 as kids I remember a pathway that ran down from Windy Hill (behind Beeston Council School)to Stones Pond, and also a mound we knew as the Pit Hills, the remnants of opencast mining, from the top of which we had a good view of the dogs racing at Elland Road Greyhound Stadium, and then just before the last race they opened the gates and men and boys would dash down to gain entrance into the track to watch the last race for free.

Date:
28-Sep-2008

Email:
dipetmo@aol.com

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Name:
Robert Harrison

Comment:
I remember as a young Lad, Ballboying for the rugby team who played at the old greyhound stadium. They were known as New Hunslet at the time.

Date:
14-Feb-2009

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Name:
brian thomas

Comment:
Prior to its construction, Elland Road was a large plot of land at the foot of Beeston Hill, situated beside the main road (A643) to the neighbouring town of Elland. It was owned by Bentley's Brewery and was originally called the Old Peacock Ground, after the Old Peacock pub which faced the land, hence the nickname The Peacocks that would be associated with both Leeds City and United in the years to come. The first occupants were rugby league side Holbeck Rugby Club, who moved from their previous home, Holbeck Recreation Ground, and purchased the Old Peacock Ground from Bentley's for £1,100. They built a new stand for the forthcoming season and the ground soon became widely known as Elland Road.

Date:
24-Feb-2009

Email:
helensdad@mac.com

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Name:
mick pick

Comment:
many happy hours I spent at leeds dogs most sat nights even met a nice girl there but 4 got her name she worked in top bar near kennels ..it was a great atmosphere cheap or dear ring...any body remember ballygarven gem and streakalong john

Date:
08-Mar-2009

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Name:
Malcolm Spence

Comment:
Before John Charles was sold to Juventus he lived in the Heath estate. That was in the days when soccer players got nice wage 15-25 pounds per week but nothing great. After the game we kids would follow him to get his autograph. I lived in the Sunnyviews and remember late one night about 2am when my Dad got me up to see the stand at the soccer stadium burning down. That was around '58. The stand was replaced by the one nearer to to the center of picture. I also remember the first night Leeds played under the lights. I went to see the game, it was impressive.

Date:
05-May-2009

Email:
malcolmspence@msn.com

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Name:
Steve Jones

Comment:
This view provides a good look at a couple of major south/west Leeds water courses. In the top centre of the picture, the Leeds/Manchester railway is seen crossing the ring road and, a bit further left, Royds Lane. Just to the right of the ring road bridge the Wortley Beck culvert can be seen emerging from under the railway embankment as a dead straight diagonal line, crossing the plot which would later become the site of Trust Motors' Volkswagen showroom and the Wallace Arnold coach terminal. After crossing beneath Gelderd Road, the beck emerges into the open and meanders along the edge of the large, light coloured field in top centre (which would later be occupied by YEB offices). In the lower-right corner of this field, Wortley Beck is joined by Mill Shaw Beck which flows in from the left, along the lower boundary of this field. The Mill Shaw Beck can be seen running parallel to the ring road in the upper left of the picture. The enlarged Wortley Beck then flows under the Leeds/London railway and meanders behind the Elland Road stadium, where it becomes a substantial water course. From the lower-right of the photo, the beck crosses Lowfields Road and Brown Lane, where it becomes Low Beck (and where a weir was constructed in order to create the mill stream, or goit, which fed a Holbeck corn mill on Mill Green). The main water course of Low Beck continues south eastwards towards the Holbeck railway viaduct and Domestic Street (becoming Hol Beck along the way) before flowing alongside the present Holbeck Lane & Water Lane and into the Aire at Victoria Bridge. Sadly, almost all of this water course is now hidden from view, due to culverting - which is a shame, as the current water quality is now higher than at any point in my lifetime. I well remember the stink of Hol Beck at the old Domestic Street bridge, and never imagined that I'd see fish in this polluted water. Pottering about near the Gelderd Road bridge recently, I could see large numbers of fry, and several substantial fish happily swimming in the clear water. Remarkable!

Date:
06-Jul-2009

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Name:
Michael Nicholson

Comment:
Spent my early teens watching Hunslet at the Dog Track until Ladbrokes sold the place and Hunslet had to go to Batley for a few years. Been looking for any images of Hunslet playing there back then but, barring a St Helens site I've long lost the link for, can't find any. Can anyone help or did I dream the entire mid/late 70's? PS - Philip, were you the little kid who used to run the length of the pitch at halftime?

Date:
10-Jul-2009

Email:
mike.nicholson@ianflockton.co.uk

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Name:
Jacquic

Comment:
The white buildings opposite the greyhound track (which I recall was also the home of Hunslet Rugby League Football Club in the 70's is Jackson Boilers who became TI Catering. I worked there from 1975-77 when TI's other site on Armley Road (by the side of Crown House) was closed

Date:
06-Oct-2009

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Name:
Richard Craven

Comment:
We called the Milky Way the Beeston Bumps, and to get there we had to come down Crow Nest Lane. In those days there was a sharp bend at the bottom before accessing the Ring Road.

Date:
04-Aug-2010

Email:
craven391@btinternet.com

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Name:
john

Comment:
I USED TO GO TO THE TRACK TWICE A WEEK DURING 1979 TO 1981 I REMEMBER A DOG CALLED CARELESS SAM ALWAYS SEEMED TO WIN THE LONGER DISTANCE RACES IN 1978 MY FRIEND RAN A DOG AT ELLAND ROAD CALLED COOLSCART DARKIE I KEEP LOOKING ON EBAY ETC FOR OLD RACE CARDS SO I CAN LOOK BACK AT SOME REALLY HAPPY MEMORIES...

Date:
14-Sep-2010

Email:
john59brown29@yahoo.co.uk

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Name:
peter sedgwick

Comment:
I do remember riding my bike on the milky way that was a few years ago

Date:
16-Sep-2010

Email:
peter_sedgwick@bellaliant.net

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Name:
Kim Hunter

Comment:
Hi guys. I'm writing a scene for a novel in which one man gives another a tip for a dog race at Elland Road. The novel is set in 1982, just before the track closed. I want to make sure I get the details right. Does anybody know what date the track closed? Does anybody remember the closing night? Was it an open track? The dog is supposed to be a newcomer that has won its first four races. What would its odds have been a couple of days before the race? Where would they have been published? any help gratefully received! Thanks a lot, Kim

Date:
30-Sep-2010

Email:
kiminscarborough@googlemail.com

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Name:
jeremy sharman

Comment:
i lived at number 11 heath road until i was 14, john charles lived at number 17, jack charlton lived at the top of the street, there was also jimmy dunn and another footballer who i forget his name, however he after football had a pub in gilersome.in those days the trams turned around at the bottom heath road, streetswere car free and these footballers would have a kick around with usin the street.from my back bedroom window i watched the old stand burn down approx 1957ish, main struts from the fire wereused as barriers on the leeds training pitch for along time. at the top of heath road was an old pit heap and there was for years two open mine shafts which were not sealed off what went down them was nobodies business, fortunatly not me, however it was a miracle!behind the slag heap was a big pond we used to play and catch newts.to the right of the slag heap was an lod path that led passed a farm that went up to beeston primary school,it ws great in the farmers fields towards the railway line as there was loads of old lorries we played in , they had an red indian motif on the narrow bonnet.regarding tha "milky way" we new them as the rusty bumps because they were made out of old slagand iron ore, once a telegram lad on his red motorbike gave us kids a ride round on the back whipee it was brill.send more memories soon.

Date:
08-Dec-2010

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Name:
jeremy sharman

Comment:
i used to live at number 11 heath road nearly ajacent to the entrance to heath road entrance . harold wiilamson used to live at number 2 , after football he had a pub in gildersome maybe he still has ? at number 17 john charles lived and at the top of the road to the feft jack charlton lived ( used to get loads of empties for money back to take to offy , made our pocket money up, good old jack !).at the top our road was a pit hill with two open mine shafts, with a bit of tatty barbed wire round its lucky none of us fell down, but bet your bottom dollar alot of "stuff " was chucked down.beyond the pit hill was a pond , we used to catch newts and played pirates ect ect great stuff. along side of pit hill was a path that passed an old farm that led to beeston primary school. in the fields the farmer had old lorries we used to play in , they had a red indian motif on the short bonnet, again great stuff. regarding the "milky way " we new them as the"the rusty bumps "because they were made out of the old slag and iron hence the grey and red colour. after the dog night and football game i used to go and roam about often finding the odd copper , tanner and once a ten bob note that was dropped by those trying to catch the tram that turned round at the bottom of heath road. another play ground was the right hand side of wesley street it was a scrap yard which had old boilers ect that was great for war games. all along elland road was brick works leading down to top moor side,tyre factories,what a healthy place to be !. more to come later.

Date:
08-Dec-2010

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Name:
Peter Moore

Comment:
Re comments by Jeremy Sharman, the footballer he refers to was called Harold Williams, when he retired he took over the tenancy of The Railway pub situated at the top end of Town Street Beeston, my family and I lived just across the road at No 86, he was there until the pub was demolished in the late 50's early 60's, when he then moved into a pub in Gildersome from where he retired in 1986, as far as I am aware he is still alive.(Dec 23/2010)

Date:
23-Dec-2010

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Name:
Philip Jackson

Comment:
I use to live at 29 ring road beeston and remember the so called Milky way very well, It was only a short walk from where I lived and often went there with my friends, and coming home from Beeston C.P School jump over the school wall onto crows nest lane and pass by it on the way home. I wonder what happened to all my school pals, John Walker, Allen Garret. John Gee, Robert Deacon, Brian Schofield?

Date:
16-Jan-2011

Email:
anneandphil@btinternet.com

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Name:
tonymorgan

Comment:
can anyone remember the nickname of the old dog track?

Date:
19-Jan-2011

Email:
pankmorgan@hotmail.com

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Name:
Tina Haigh

Comment:
The tiny buildings just above Jackson Boilers going towards rail track was OZALID, a paper company. I worked in the Office by day from 1973 and by night I worked in Bar 7 at the Greyhound track as did many of the local teens at the time. I lived on Elland Road, the last house on the corner for a few years during that time.

Date:
12-Jun-2011

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Name:
JIM WHEELER

Comment:
Further to the comments about watching the game at Elland Road when United switched on for the first ever a floodlit game at the ground, it was Monday, November 9th, 1953. I still have the programme and it was priced 2d in old pre-decimal currency. They played the Scottish club Hibernian and the United team on the programme was WOOD DUNN HAIR, KERFOOT MARSDEN BURDEN, forwards were WIILIAMS CARTER CHARLES IGGLEDSEN TYRER. Harold Williams is still alive. Raich Carter, the England international was the the manager and he played that night. The Hibernian side had a formidable forward line that read,ORMOND,TURNBULL,REILLY,JOHNSTONE,SMITH. They also had Tommy Younger in goal and if my memory serves me correctly he was the experienced goalkeeper that Don Revie signed when he first became manager of United. I cannot remember what the result was that night. The programme notes seem to say that floodlit football would remain a novelty but was not a long term benifit to the game!!!

Date:
05-Jul-2011

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Name:
Brian Thomas

Comment:
Re - Jim Wheeler's comments about LUFC first floodlit match.I was at that game and have scoured the 'net for info on it. Thanks Jim for filling in the void.

Date:
28-Jul-2011

Email:
helensdad@mac.com

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Name:
Melanie (Wortley)

Comment:
Apparently West Yorks Police are going to close Millgarth and Deswbury Rd police staions and build a new City & Holbeck station on the old greyhound stadium site

Date:
28-Jul-2011

Email:
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Name:
sandra cooper nee stobart

Comment:
my sistersusan and i lived on the kirkdales. my dad worked at job day engineers on the ring road. we used to ride down to the ups and downs and call and see our dad working in the machine shop great times.

Date:
22-Aug-2011

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Name:
christine tomlinson

Comment:
my dad Sid Spurr had the corner shop at the bottom of wesley street/elland road, i remember helping out on match nights with pie and peas, my dads 'office' was the peacock pub, he always sat at the end of the bar on his stool, sadly he died in 1980.

Date:
29-Aug-2011

Email:
chris@chrissyt.plus.com

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Name:
Valerie Franks

Comment:
I was a kennel maid at the greyhound stadium from 1954-57.There were 4 blocks of 20 kennels,most kennels housing two dogs.There were 4 trainers,Billy Brook,Alf Eggleston,Doug Twitchett, and Tommy Brown.The racing manager was Mr.Richards, and the general manager George Wilson.

Date:
06-Sep-2011

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Name:
Keith Nicholson

Comment:
I attended Beeston CPS till I passed my 11plus and went to Cockburn. I watched Leeds Utd when Jack Charlton played in the UNDER 18's. Yes - the team then mainly all lived on the Heaths. Remember the tragic fire at Harold Williams house and John Charles used to live on the estate and wave at the fans from his window. Andy Mcall lived on the Heaths and I remember Stuart (his son and ex Bradfoird City and scotland) being born, My mum worked at a farm half way down Crow Nest Lane and if you followed the lane past the farm it brought you out at a 'field' at the back of the Dog track where Beeston CPS played Rugby. However, the dog stadium used this field to walk their dogs round. Often you finished your Rugby Game covered in dog muck!! Wasn't the original DRYSALTERS PUB on the bend at the bottom of Crow Nest Lane?? Happy Days!!!

Date:
23-Sep-2011

Email:
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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
It is interesting to note Keith Nicholson's comment about the location of the old DRYSALTER'S public house. Have a look at the 'clashes of opinion' which are raging on 2009106_169533. If anyone has any evidence please leave a comment on that particular picture.

Date:
28-Nov-2011

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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Name:
Stephen Clayforth

Comment:
I remember the 'Milky Way' well. I lived on the Heights Estate. Armley and used to regularly cycle down with my mates to what we always referred to as the 'Beeston Bumps'. I don't know the names of them but I do remember one that was very steep,narrow and deep (often filled with water or muddy)and one of my mates went down and buckled his front wheel and had to walk all the way back home (quite a long way)carrying his bike. I also remember that there were quite a few falls and a couple of broken arms and one broken leg. I remember Elland Road Football Ground in the early 60's used to open the back gates at half time and many of us kids (who couldn't afford the entry fee) used to sneak in for free and watch the second half. I also remember that during the late 60's (approx 68/9) I was working for Leeds City Transport and used to volunteer for the 'Football Specials' where we used to ferry the fans from West Leeds to Elland Road and we were allowed in for free though we did have to go back to our buses before the final whistle. Many the time we have missed the last 10 mins where Leeds scored the goals to win the match and all we could hear was the cheering. In 1970 I worked for a Chartered Accountant who was an avid follower of the Greyhound Racing at Elland Road and quite often he used to take me to a meeting. He kept all the form books, including time trials, and was convinced he knew which dogs were going to win (all the dogs were kennelled at the track and if they didn't win occassionly they would be transferred to other tracks so it was relatively easy to spot trends and if they were placed against slower dogs). We always placed reversed forecast bets (I only placed a couple of shillings at a time due to not earning a lot) on the Tote because it was never certain which of two dogs would win. This system generally worked fine until one particular Winter night when the weather was so cold that the hare froze up and they had to go round with a blow torch to defrost the wire. That particular night the first couple of races went against the form book but I noticed that those dogs that had gained a pound or two just before the race appeared to be the winners (possibly the extra fat allowed them to withstand the cold better rather than slow them down as usual) and so I started betting on them. That night I won every race after the first couple and came away with several pounds, which to me at that time seemed like a small fortune. Happy days. Several years later (after my marriage breakup) I met a girl who worked in the restaurant at the Greyhound Track and, although never having eaten there, used to meet her outside after her shift and always thought it was a very popular place. Unfortunately we lost touch when the restaurant, and the track, shut.

Date:
25-Dec-2011

Email:
haradwaithe@tiscali.co.uk

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Name:
Chris Went (nee Rhodes)

Comment:
My father, Harry Rhodes, was a part-time dog walker at the greyhound stadium just before the war. His brother Alfred worked there full time. One of the trainers he used to mention was "Eggy" - and I presume this was Alf Eggleston mentioned by Valerie Franks.

Date:
26-Dec-2011

Email:
madkatsmum@hotmail.co.uk

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Name:
Simon Eggleston

Comment:
When I was growing up in the 1960s and 70s, my father Alf Eggleston (Eggy) worked at the stadium as a greyhound trainer until about 1972. Me and my sister would often be there on a Saturday. I remember the smell of beer from the old club house. I would walk up to the kennels with my father and sister “Yvonne”, passing the kitchens were the food for the dogs were prepared “which I think was on the left hand side”. Dad would always have plenty of tips if his dog came in first. Just before my father passed away in late 2009 he passed his winning trophies to me “LEEDS EBBOR STAKES 1959 & 2 for NEWS OF THE WORLD INTERNATIONAL INTER-TRACK”. I do have a number of photographs of my father and people he worked with from around the 1950s to the 70s; it keeps the childhood memories going”.

Date:
20-Feb-2012

Email:
simon-eggleston@fsmail.net

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Name:
sandra cooper nee stobart

Comment:
hi wendy collins i think you went to lower wortley school. my sister susan and i lived on the kirkdales. i have put some photos on leodis of may day at the school i think you are on these.

Date:
10-Jul-2012

Email:
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Name:
DENISE MARSH

Comment:
Most interested in the photo and comments. I am at Uni doing a PhD on the social history of greyhound racing 1926-1951. If anyone can help with memories, scans of greyhound memorabilia, family anecdotes from this period etc. please contact me.

Date:
19-Jul-2012

Email:
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Name:
Wendy Collins

Comment:
Sorry Sandra, not guilty, I went to Beeston C.P.School. However, I notice that you wrote about Job Days; my late sister Maureen worked in the office there, her first employment after leaving school. She used to mention the people she worked with, one was Jack Stobart presumably your father.

Date:
03-Aug-2012

Email:
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Name:
John Cave

Comment:
For some years I have had this fantastic photo as my Desktop as it covers teh area where I spent much of my 'youff'. As far as I am able to work out it must have been taken in about 1963 because they are just starting to drill trial bore holes in what was our hay field (top center) prior to building what was to be The YEB (Yorkshire Electricity Board) main offices now, partly, the Porche Dealer and a Premier Inn. Our family owned the small farm located on Royds Lane behind the Wheatsheaf pub. The area we farmed was bordered by the railway line over the ring road, BOC (British Oxygen Company) and then Wortley Beck to the right' Fairburn & Lawson Sportds field, the Ring Road and finally Gelderd Road up towards the now defunct Pack Horse Pub. I lived at the Farm House from about 1959 until I left for London in 1962 but Dad continued to live in the old farm house for about 30 years after that. There is now a huge warehouse built over what was the farmhouse. It was basically a dairy farm and my grandad had a milkround dowm in the Oswolds and Danubes further down Gelderd Road as well a bit in Churwell nad the Royds near to Job Day. I was always confused to the differentiation between Near and Far Royds. Some of you may remember the long dark,spooky tunnel on Royds Lane that run under the railway bridge to Farnley Engine Sheds. It is still there but fly tipping has rendered it almost closed now. The photo clearly shows the culvert under our cow field taking Wortley beck to the otherside of Gelderd Road. My brother and I were always warned off exploring this although before he died my Dad admitted that he had walked it when he was a boy in the 1930's The Beeston Bumps or Ups and Downs were indeed the names we used and the 'Wall of Death' certainly was a well known feature. There are some lovely photos of this area on Leodis, I especailly like teh ones taken in teh 1930's when teh Ring Road was being built as it shows our farm before it was cut in two by the road. The little building behind the Wheatsheaf is the CWS (coop society) soft drinks depot and the white stuff in front of the farm buildings is lime - a waste product from the BOC acetyline production - which my Dad sold to sewage works for many years. I used to score and play now and again for the Fairburn & Lawson cricket team and always went to their Sports Day as we delivered milk for the event. Our walk to Elland Road - one I try and replicate to this day. was to walk down Royds Lane past the 'Sheaf, down the Ring Road, until the Bumps where there was a cut through passage to Elland Road, under the railway bridge to the ground itself. I still feel the ghosts of 60 years ago watching me as I make that fortnightly trudge. Anybody wanting to swap memories of this area is welcome to email me - I have swapped stories with the Stobart girl(s) previoulsy as both families lived on the Kirkdales for a time. I ahve posted some 1950's related blogs in the The Square Ball Fanzine one of which covered the Hibernian Floodlit first game at Elland Road.

Date:
12-Dec-2012

Email:
jailhousejohn@btinternet.com

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Name:
sandra cooper nee stobart

Comment:
hi john cave my dad jack worked at job days. i remember the ups and downs we used to go see my dad at work on the way down. the fitting shop front doors were always open in summer. i remember the tunnel. i had a friend thelma todd who lived on royds lane above darmons shop.what memories.

Date:
02-Jan-2013

Email:
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Name:
Joihn Cave

Comment:
Hi Sandra I do remeber you of course as I think our parents were quite friendly for a time and we would deliver milk to you I think. I remember your Dad at Job Days because we delivered milk there as well. Didnt they make tea packing equipment? I too knew the Todds - although I think Dot Todd - who I knewe better - was older than Thelma. I think they were next door to Damons rather than above but perhaps I am wrong after all this time

Date:
12-Jan-2013

Email:
jailhousejohn@btinternet.com

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Name:
sandra cooper nee stobart

Comment:
hi john cave. job day did make tea packing machines. my dad went all over the world fitting these in many countries. thelma todd was my age i think they did live next to darmons.if you type in job day there is a picture on leodis. my dad is the one in the white coat.

Date:
21-Jan-2013

Email:
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Name:
Graham A. Schofield

Comment:
With reference to section in John Cave's comment, where he mentions a confusion over the differentiation of the Near and Far Royds. There were three "Royds" in the Beeston vicinity, and their locations seem to have radiated from the old village of Beeston. (1) - The nearest one being, BEESTON NEAR ROYDS, which now no longer exists. Its skeleton lies buried beneath "The Junction One Retail Park". (2) -The next was/is BEESTON ROYDS. This sits on the high ground somewhere between Gelderd Road and Whitehall Road, in the vicinity of the old Hill Top Cemetery, Cottingley Spring and Spring End Farm. (3) - The third was/is FAR ROYDS, which was situated adjacent to Royd's Hall. Today, it all lies buried beneath what is now a Business Park situated around the area of Royd's Hall Lane and Royd's Lane, adjacent to Beeston Bridge. The three individual titles may have been 'established' when the early cartographers arrived in Beeston. The local inhabitants no doubt referred to them by those, or similar names, and the early map-makers, who often relied upon local knowledge, probably wrote those names onto their charts, thus setting them down as such, in what we might refer to as 'tablets of stone'. If my speculation is correct, can you imagine a different scenario? What if the map-makers had arrived in say, Lower Wortley first? Would the titles have been in reverse order? For those of you who don't know, the word ROYD (especially in Yorkshire and Lancashire) generally translates as "A Clearing in a Wood".

Date:
08-Mar-2013

Email:
GrahamScho@AOL.com

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Name:
Vern

Comment:
@Simon Egglestone Hi Simon, I remember you well, we were in the same class at Hugh Gaitskell. Good to see you're well, keep those childhood memories going - we'll lose them with our marbles eventually:)

Date:
15-Apr-2013

Email:
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Name:
Brenda nee Tallant Blanchard

Comment:
At the top left is what was then Paragon Sheet Metal/ Kennings Coachworks, just before reaching Geldard Road Wheatsheaf junction. I worked here when leaving school in 1958. I walked all the way from the Marleys at Beeston or cycled. No Bus in those days

Date:
24-May-2013

Email:
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Name:
s thompson

Comment:
hard to believe Jack Charlton lived on this estate when he won the world cup.............imagine Ronaldo, Messi, Rooney living there??

Date:
18-Dec-2013

Email:
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Name:
Henry Orl

Comment:
It seems LUFC were destined to have financial problems.Thrown out of the league in 1919 for illegal payments. Hmm..... not much has changed.

Date:
11-Apr-2014

Email:
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This photograph cannot be purchased due to copyright restrictions.